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Important Dates
Conference: May 29th-31st, 2019
Abstract submission deadline:
January 23rd, 2019 February 1st, 2019 Anywhere on Earth”, i.e., UTC-12
Regular paper submission deadline:
February 1st, 2019 February 10th, 2019 Anywhere on Earth”
Notification to authors and registration opening:
March 18th, 2019 April 1st, 2019
Camera-ready copy deadline for all paper types:
April 2nd, 2019 April 12th, 2019
Author registration deadline:
April 28th, 2019
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Contact
Organization : Organization committee
Webmaster : Samedi Heng
Conference Program
WEDNESDAY MAY 29, 2019
 
8h30
9h00
Registration
 
 
9h00
9h30
Welcome
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Slide link
 
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Coffee Break
 
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Paper 54 (Full Paper): The Effects of Consumer Interests in Top Box Office Movies in Thailand: evidence from the pre-during-post-peak periods.
Mathupayas Thongmak Abstract :

This paper examined the information searches by consumers for movies from one-year Google Trends data and their relationship with the top box-office movies’ performance. Top five box-office movie data over a 53-week period were collected from boxofficemojo.com and Google Trends. Both Web search and YouTube search in the Arts & Entertainment category and the Online Communities category were explored. Two hundred sixty-five movies, listed in Thailand box office in 2017, were gathered for the analysis phase. Interest over time scores, showing relative search volume from Google Trends, represented the level of consumers’ interests in the movies over time. This study tried to investigate the impacts of consumer interests before, during, and after the peak period on the rank of the movie. Results partially supported the correlations between consumer interests in the pre-peak period and the movie rank, fully supported the correlations between consumer interests in the during-peak period and the movie rank, and supported the correlations between consumer interests in the post-peak period and the movie rank. Findings also indicated higher consumer interests in the during-peak period than the pre-peak period and higher consumer interests in the during-peak period than the post-peak period. In addition, there were an association between two movie ranks in consecutive week and a positive correlation between the latest movie rank and the time to be on the top box office chart.
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Free time
 
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Welcome Reception
Place : Comics Art Museum Brussels
THURSDAY MAY 30, 2019
 
8h30
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Registration
 
 
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Welcome
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Keynote 2 : Towards Cross-Media Information Spaces and Architectures.
Prof. Beat Signer, VUBrussels (Belgium)
Session chair: Jean Vanderdonckt
Room 2215
Abstract :

The efficient management and retrieval of information has been investigated since the early days of Vannevar Bush's seminal article 'As We May Think' introducing the Memex. However, nowadays information is fragmented across different media types, devices as well as digital and physical environments and we are often struggling to find information. In this keynote I will discuss three main issues to be addressed when developing solutions for managing information in these co-called cross-media information spaces. We first have a look at an extensible cross-media linking solution based on the RSL (resource-selector-link) hypermedia metamodel where information can be integrated across applications, devices as well as digital and physical information environments. I will then outline some of the limitations of existing digital document formats which are often just a simulation of paper documents and their affordances on desktop computers, and discuss more flexible document representations for cross-media information spaces. Further, new forms of human-information interaction and cross-media user interfaces, including some recent work on dynamic data physicalisation, are introduced. Various research artefacts such as the EdFest interactive paper prototype, the PimVis solution for personal cross-media information management or the MindXpres platform for next generation presentation solutions will be used to illustrate different aspects of the presented data-centric approach for cross-media information spaces and architectures. Last but not least, I will provide an outlook on how the embedding of the presented concepts at the level of an operating system might ultimately lead to new possibilities for cross-media information management and innovative forms of human-information interaction.
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Paper 34 (Full Paper): Procrastination on Social Networking Sites: Combating by Design.
Abdulaziz Alblwi, Angelos Stefanidis, Keith Phalp, Raian Ali. Abstract :

Procrastination refers to a voluntary postponement that prevents people from performing their tasks and can hurt productivity and wellbeing. Procrastination might occur due to a lack of motivation to perform tasks or due to the low self-control that people might have over their time and task management. Social Networking Sites (hereafter SNS) are designed to enable their users to engage in online interaction for different purposes such as increasing popularity or exploring information. SNS embed influence and persuasion techniques to attract users which can make them a medium for procrastination where some users fail to maintain a desirable level of self-control over their usage. However, we argue that advances in persuasive technology and gamification techniques can be utilised to augment SMS and help users to regain self-control over their procrastination. Implementing these techniques correctly means that users can still enjoy accessing SNS while maintaining a desirable level of control over their procrastination. Building these anti-procrastination tools, however, is a challenging design activity due to their potential of triggering negative side-effects such as reactance and workarounds, and affecting the overall user experience. In this paper, we conduct user studies, consisting of an exploratory stage using focus groups, diary study and interviews and followed by a design stage based mainly on co-design sessions. Our studies’ participants self-declared having a problematic degree of procrastination on SNS, to explore procrastination countermeasure techniques that can augment the future designs of SNS and how best to apply them.
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Paper 69 (Full Paper): Infoxication in the Genomic Data Era and Implications in the Development of Information Systems.
Ana León and Oscar Pastor. Abstract :

We live in an age where data acquisition is no longer a problem and the real challenge is how to determine which information is the right one to take important and sometimes difficult decisions. Infoxication (also known as Infobesity or Information Overload) is a term used to describe the difficulty of adapting to new situations and effectively making decisions when there is too much information to manage. With the advent of the Big Data, infoxication is affecting critical domains such as Health Sciences, where tough decisions for patient’s health is being taken every day based on heterogeneous, unconnected and sometimes conflicting information. In order to understand the magnitude of the challenge, based on the information publicly available about the genetic causes of the disease and using data quality assessment techniques, we performed an exhaustive analysis of the DNA variations that have been associated to the risk of suffering migraine headache. The same analysis has been repeated 8 months after, and the results have allowed us to exemplify i) how fragile is the information in this domain, ii) the difficulty of finding repositories of contrasted and reliable data, and iii) the need to have information systems that, far from integrating and storing huge volumes of data, are able to support the decision-making process by providing mechanisms agile and flexible enough to be able to adapt to the changing user needs.
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Paper 17 (Full Paper): GDPR Compliance in the Design of the INFORM e-Learning Platform: a Case Study.
Evangelia Vanezi, Dimitrios Kouzapas, Georgia M. Kapitsaki, Theodora Costi, Alexandros Yeratziotis, Christos Mettouris, Anna Philippou and George A. Papadopoulos. Abstract :

The European Union General Data Protection Regulation (GDPR) governs personal data processing, aiming to ensure privacy in all systems handling such data. All systems that process personal data, including software systems are legally obliged to comply to all articles of the GDPR applicable to them. In this paper, the case study of an e-Learning software platform, namely the INFORM platform and its compliance to relevant articles of the GDPR is presented. The e-Learning platform was developed with the objective to host the educational material developed under the JUSTICE EU-funded project INFORM, targeting judiciary, court staff and legal practitioners, in order to provide free and open distance access to the content. In particular, the paper demonstrates the compliance of the platform with the articles and principles of: Data Minimisation, Lawfulness of Processing, Right to Erasure, Right of Access, Right to Data Portability, Right to Rectification and Security of Processing. By applying these articles, conformance to the provision for Data Protection by design is also achieved; the platform’s software development process integrates the articles of the GDPR early in the development steps, from the specification and design phases. We show how the design process progressed and demonstrate the corresponding functionality within the e-Learning platform. The paper extracts a list of lessons learned and conclusions on software GDPR compliance.
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Paper 44 (Full Paper): Towards a Prioritization of e-Government Challenges: an Exploratory Study in Belgium.
Hendrik Vandenberghe, Muriel Macken and Anthony Simonofski. Abstract :

New developments in information and communica-tions technologies can enable governments to improve their inter-nal functioning as well as the services they offer to users. This transformation entails several hurdles that have been discussed extensively in existing literature. However, challenges are rarely ranked in terms of importance leaving practitioners in the dark regarding which one to tackle first. This paper analyzes, interlinks and prioritizes challenges that employees in federal, regional and local level experience in the further development of e(lectronic)-government in Belgium. Data was collected through six in-depth interviews and a focus group of three persons. The data was then analyzed following the Grounded Theory method. This allows to understand reasons for the relative lag Belgium has compared to countries leading the e-government charge.

The findings reveal that coordination and alignment issues (a lack of end-to-end thinking) constitute the main obstacle for Bel-gian governmental authorities regarding further e-government development. Finally, current policies are reviewed to search for possible leads for solutions for the challenges discussed. This paper contributes to existing research in e-government, by explicitly dis-tinguishing crucial challenges and ranking them on importance. This allows both researchers and practitioners to focus on focusing on the most important hurdles to further development.
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Paper 22 (Full Paper): Towards a Software Sustainability-Quality Model: Insights from a Multi-Case Study.
Nelly Condori-Fernández and Patricia Lago. Abstract :

Background. Software sustainability is defined in terms of multiple and interdependent dimensions (economic, social, technical and environmental). Preliminary initiatives have investigated the contribution of certain quality attributes to sustainability dimensions. Problem. Despite these valuable efforts, the characterization of software sustainability is still a key challenge. This entails how sustainability can be embraced in the design of software systems by identifying the relevant software quality attributes (QAs) and their dependencies. Both attributes and dependencies vary heavily with amongst others the type of software system and its operational context. Aim and Method. We followed a multiple case study research method with the main objective ofinvestigating the applicability of the sustainability model in different contexts. We aim also to enrich our model, by means of identifying missing quality attributes or new contributions to the sustainability dimensions. We selected two software projects as cases of our study, where each one was independently conducted in specific situations. Results. The results of the study show that the relevant quality requirements identified in both projects (cases) are covered by most of the QAs related to the social (82%) and technical (83%) dimensions. Moreover, some QAs that were not addressed in the corresponding projects, their relevance like context completeness, and flexibility were acknowledged. These results suggest that the software sustainability model could support the identification of relevant QAs. The case study also contributed to identify QAs that had not been considered in the economic, technical and social dimensions of the sustainability-quality model.
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Guided Tour
 
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Conference Dinner
Place : La Manufacture
FRIDAY MAY 31, 2019
 
8h30
9h30
Registration
 
 
9h30
10h00
Welcome
10h00
11h00
Keynote 3: Towards a Digital Business Operating System.
Prof. Jan Bosch, Chalmers University of Technology (Sweden)
Session chair: Yves Wautelet
Room 2215
Abstract :

We are living in the most exciting time in the history of mankind. The last century has seen unprecedented improvements in the quality of the human condition and technology is at the heart of this progress. Now we are experiencing an even bigger leap as we move towards a new level of digitalization and automation. Ranging from self-driving cars to factories without workers to societal infrastructure, every sensor and actuator is becoming connected and new applications that enable new opportunities are appearing daily. The fuel of this emerging connected, software-driven reality is software and the key challenge is to continuously deliver value to customers. The future of software business in this context is centered around four main developments: Speed, Data, Ecosystems and Empowerment. The focus on speed is concerned with the constantly increasing rate of deploying new software in the field. This continuous integration and deployment is no longer only the purview of internet companies but is also increasingly deployed in embedded systems. Second, data is concerned with the vast amounts of information collected from systems deployed in the field and the behavior of the users of these systems. Software businesses need to significantly improve their ability to exploit the value present in that data. Third, ecosystems are concerned with the transition in many companies from doing everything in-house to strategic use of innovation partners and partners providing commodity functionality. Finally, empowerment is concerned with addressing the challenges that traditional hierarchical forms of organization and the quest for alternative forms of organizing work based on empowerment and autonomy. The keynote addresses these four main developments, provides numerous examples from the Nordic and international industry and discusses the role of continuous integration, continuous deployment and devops in the transition from efficiency of software to effectiveness. It summarizes the next steps that industry and academia need to engage in to remain competitive.
 
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Tutorial 3: Using 4C/ID for Teaching Conceptual Modeling.
Author: Daria Bogdanova.
Session chair: Stephan Poelmans
Room 2 Abstract :

The acquisition of conceptual modelling skills is a complex learning task: a business analyst or functional analyst must have the necessary knowledge of different modelling techniques (eg. UML class diagrams, Use Case diagrams, state charts, BPMN), the ability of abstract thinking so as to think in terms of concepts rather than of concrete objects and skills to correctly analyze requirements, distilling concepts from them, and converting these to a correct model. Part of the difficulties of learning conceptual modelling result from the fact that multiple good solutions exist for a single problem, and each of these solutions may have different advantages and disadvantages. The learning process therefore requires a lot of exercising, supported by individual feedback from the teacher. Moreover, the ill-structured nature of the problems calls for detailed and elaborative rather than merely corrective feedback. Heterogeneous groups of students make the educators’ task even more challenging as students typically learn at different paces.

The acquisition of conceptual modelling skills is a complex learning task: a business analyst or functional analyst must have the necessary knowledge of different modelling techniques (eg. UML class diagrams, Use Case diagrams, state charts, BPMN), the ability of abstract thinking so as to think in terms of concepts rather than of concrete objects and skills to correctly analyze requirements, distilling concepts from them, and converting these to a correct model. Part of the difficulties of learning conceptual modelling result from the fact that multiple good solutions exist for a single problem, and each of these solutions may have different advantages and disadvantages. The learning process therefore requires a lot of exercising, supported by individual feedback from the teacher. Moreover, the ill-structured nature of the problems calls for detailed and elaborative rather than merely corrective feedback. Heterogeneous groups of students make the educators’ task even more challenging as students typically learn at different paces.

To tackle these problems, the LIRIS research centre developed a modelling method (MERODE) that provides the learners with clear criteria on how to address the modelling problem, and what criteria to use to assess a model's quality. The method is supported by a didactic modelling and simulation tool (JMermaid/MERLIN). It helps junior modellers to form a concrete representation of the information system that will result from their model. JMermaid and MERLIN also support the learner by giving feedback during the modelling and simulation process.

Despite the support of such didactic tool, student still have the need for a phased learning trajectory that allows students learning at their individual pace. We addressed this need by developing a blended learning course based on the instructional design method 4C/ID (introduced by J. van Merrienboer).

This tutorial reviews the development of this course. We start with a brief introduction to the 4C/ID model. Then for each of its components (learning tasks, supportive information, part-task practice and just-in-time information), we let the participants reflect on how to apply the concepts for designing a conceptual learning environment or course, and then explain how we applied it in our course while making used of the edX platform. In particular, we explain how exercises are developed as whole tasks with decreasing learner support. We report about an experiment that measured the impact of introducing "part-task practice" on students' ability to solve more complex exercises and explain how personalized feedback can be provided for such tasks.

Finally, student's behaviour has been studied based on log-data from the environment. We also report how the better and worse students display different behaviour in their use of the learning environment.
 
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Lunch and Conference Goodbye
 






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